Top Bike Computers: Which bike computers are recommended by Bike Computer Reviews as the best computers for cyclists?

  1. Garmin Edge 500 Bicycle GPS UnitBike computer reviews for Garmin Edge 500
  2. SIGMA BC1606L 16-Function Wired Bike ComputerBike computer reviews for Sigma BC1606L
  3. Cateye CC-RD300W Strada Wireless Bike ComputerBike computer reviews for Cateye CC-RD300W
  4. SIGMA BC906 9-Function Wired Bike Computer

Garmin Edge Bicycle GPS Unit

Sharpen your cycling performance with Edge 500, a lightweight GPS-based cycling computer for performance-driven cyclists. Loaded with data, Edge 500 tracks your distance, speed, location and elevation with high sensitivity GPS.   Read more!

SIGMA BC1606L 16-Function Wired Bike Computer

Sigma's BC 1606L is the top model for the most demanding of riders, even at night. The BC 1606L succeeds in this not only by providing a better overview of the essential information during a ride by hiding the total accumulated functions...   Read more!

CatEye Bike Computer Reviews Spring 2013

For 2013, the CatEye bike computer lineup includes five new wireless models, the Stealth 50 (CC-GL50), the Stealth 10 (CC-GL10) the Strada Digital Wireless (CC-RD430DW), the Strada Digital Wireless (CC-RD410DW) and the Strada Slim (CC-RD310W).

Older wireless bike computer models that are still being manufactured include the Adventure (CC-AT200W), the Micro Wireless (CC-MC200W), the CatEye Fit (CC-PD100W), the Commuter (CC-COM10W), the Strada Digital Wireless (CC-RD420DW), the Strada Double Wireless (CC-RD400DW), the Strada Wireless (CC-RD300W), and the Urban Wireless (CC-VT220W).

Wired bike computer models still in production include the Strada Cadence (CC-RD200), the Enduro (CC-ED400), the Velo 9 (CC-VL820), and the Velo 7 (CC-VL520).

CatEye lists 8 bike computer models as “Archived Products,” including the V3 (CC-TR300TW), the V2c (CC-TR200DW), the Strada (CC-RD100N), the Micro Wireless (CC-MC100W), the Vectra Wireless (CC-VT100W), the Enduro 8 (CC-ED300), the Velo 8 (CC-VL810), and the Velo 5 (CC-VL510).

Several of these models are so new that they do not yet have any reviews, so the review-less bike computers are listed in a table near the end of this post. The following review analysis is focused only on the devices that actually have reviews. Here’s how the CatEye bike computers stack up against one another:

Review Quadrant Analysis – CatEye Bike Computers

CatEye Bike Computer Reviews Compared

CatEye Bike Computers
Most Recommended with Most Reviews
Micro Wireless
(MC100W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

First, in the upper-right quadrant, representing “Most Recommended with Most Reviews“, sits the lone CatEye Micro Wireless (CC-MC100W) bike computer.

CatEye Bike Computers
Most Recommended with Least Reviews
Strada Digital Wireless
(RD410DW)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

Next, in the upper-right quadrant representing the “Most Recommended with Least Reviews” category is the Strada Digital Wireless (RD410DW).

CatEye Bike Computers
Least Recommended with Most Reviews
Strada Wireless
(RD300W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Strada Double Wireless
(RD400DW)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Strada Cadence
(RD200)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Velo 5
(VL520)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
V3
(TR300TW)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Enduro 8
(ED300)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Velo 8
(VL810)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

Third, in the lower-right quadrant we find the “Least Recommended with Most Reviews” category, where we find the Strada Wireless (RD300W), Strada Double Wireless (RD400DW), Strada Cadence (RD200), Velo 5 (VL520), V3 (TR300TW), Enduro 8 (ED300), and the Velo 8 (VL810).

CatEye Bike Computers
Least Recommended with Least Reviews
Commuter
(COM10W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Micro Wireless
(MC200W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Urban Wireless
(VT220W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Adventure
(AT200W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
V2c
(TR200DW)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Vectra Wireless
(VT100W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Velo 7
(VL520)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Velo 9
(VL820)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Enduro
(ED400)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Strada Digital Wireless
(RD420DW)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

Fourth, in the lower-left “Least Recommended with Least Reviews” quadrant falls the Commuter (COM10W), Micro Wireless (MC200W), Urban Wireless (VT220W), Adventure (AT200W), V2c (TR200DW), Vectra Wireless (VT100W), Velo 7 (VL520), Velo 9 (VL820), Enduro (ED400), and the Strada Digital Wireless (RD420DW).

CatEye Bike Computers
No Reviews
Stealth 50
(GL50)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Stealth 10
(GL10)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Fit
(PD100W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Strada Digital Wireless
(RD430DW)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Strada Slim
(RD310W)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Strada
(RD100N)
More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

Last but not least, we have the CatEye bike computers without any reviews. These devices include the Stealth 50 (GL50), Stealth 10 (GL10), Fit (PD100W), Strada Digital Wireless (RD430DW), and Strada Slim (RD310W), Strada (RD100N).

Overall Reviews – CatEye Bike Computers

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Sigma Bike Computer Reviews Spring 2013

For 2013, Sigma is still listing the majority of their bike computers, including the *.12 line (including the 5.12, 8.12, 12.12, 14.12, and the 16.12) as well as the *09 line (509, 1009, 1609, and 1909) in several different configurations and capabilities. They are also no longer making available the Rox 8.0 and Rox 9.0, instead delivering their updated 8.1 and 9.1 models. All the models listed in this post are available through the major retailers still, including the *06 line (906, 1106, 1606, and 1706).

A lot of these models are so new that they do not yet have any reviews, so the reviewless bike computers are listed in a table near the end of this post. The following review analysis is focused only on the devices that actually have reviews. Here’s how the Sigma bike computers stack up against one another:

Review Quadrant Analysis – Sigma Bike Computers

Sigma Bike Computer Reviews Compared

Sigma Bike Computers
Most Recommended with Most Reviews
BC 1009 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 906 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 509 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

First, in the upper-right quadrant, representing “Most Recommended with Most Reviews“, are the BC 1009, BC 906, and BC 509. These are all lower-end computers in Sigma’s line, but according to the reviews represent a very good value and would be a good choice for most cyclists based solely on how other cyclists felt about them.

Sigma Bike Computers
Least Recommended with Most Reviews
BC 1609 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 1606L More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 2209 MHR More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 1909 HR More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 1009 STS More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

Secondly, in the lower-right quadrant we find the “Least Recommended with Most Reviews” category, where we find the BC 1609, BC1606L, BC 2209 MHR, BC 1909 HR, and the BC 1990 STS. These bike computers have many reviews, but their averages are far below the computers in the quadrant above them.

Sigma Bike Computers
Least Recommended with Least Reviews
Rox 8.0 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 1706 HR DTS More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Rox 9.0 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 1106 DTS More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 2006 MHR More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

Third, in the lower-left “Least Recommended with Least Reviews” quadrant falls the Rox 8.0, BC 1706 HR DTS, Rox 9.0, BC 1106 DTS, and the BC 2006 MHR. These bike computers all have reviews, but significantly fewer than the ones in the other quadrants.

Sigma Bike Computers
No Reviews
Rox 9.1 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
Rox 8.1 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 16.12 STS + Cadence More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 12.12 STS More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 16.12 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 14.12 ALTI More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 12.12 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 8.12 ATS More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 8.12 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 5.12 More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 2209 TARGA More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 1609 STS + Cadence More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >
BC 1609 STS More Info / Read Reviews / Buy >

Last but not least, we have the Sigma bike computers without any reviews. These devices include the Rox 9.1, Rox 8.1, BC 16.12 STS + Cadence, BC 12.12 STS, BC 16.12, BC 14.12 ALTI, BC 12.12, BC 8.12 ATS, BC 8.12, BC 5.12, BC 2209 TARGA, BC 1609 STS + Cadence, and the BC 1609 STS. Some of these bike computers are very new, and thus just haven’t been reviewed yet, but several others have been on the market for some time. If you have one of these bike computers, please let us know what you think by responding to this post. We’d like to know your experiences with them.

Overall Reviews – Sigma Bike Computers

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According to the good folks over at Patently Apple, Apple’s Smart Bicycle System patent takes the concept of on-bike technology to a new level.

On August 5, 2010, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals various concepts behind a newly advanced Smart Bicycle System in development. The premise is rather like Apple’s Nike + iPod system for runners except for cyclists. While the system is for individuals, it’s also designed to work with teams of cyclists so that they could communicate with each other on-the-fly about course difficulty or perceived problems. The Bicycle system monitors speed, distance, time, altitude, elevation, incline, decline, heart rate, power, derailleur setting, cadence, wind speed, path completed, expected future path, heart rate, power, and pace. The system could utilize various sensors built-into the iPhone in addition to working with sensors already built-into the bike itself. Apple’s patent is extraordinarily detailed and packed with interesting twists that the sporting cyclist will really appreciate.

The on-the-fly communication possibilities between cyclists in a group or on a team is one of the most interesting points in this patent.

Anyone think Apple has a chance in the cycling domain?

You can read the full story here: http://bit.ly/cgHzhr

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